About Pest Control Newbury Park

Covid-19: Rule-breakers ‘increasingly likely’ to be fined – Cressida Dick

Metropolitan Police commissioner Dame Cressida Dick

wrote in the Times that Londoners have been hosting raves, house parties and gambling events.

mouse exterminator newbury park

Source link

Tashaun Aird: Family of murdered boy critical of school exclusion

Three teenagers guilty of killing Tashaun Aird, 15

mice infestation

Source link

Millwall and QPR players to stand arm-in-arm in ‘show of solidarity’ before Tuesday’s match

Millwall and Derby players take a knee
Millwall players were booed when they took a knee before Saturday’s match against Derby

Millwall players will not take a knee before Tuesday’s Championship fixture against QPR but will stand arm-in-arm in a “show of solidarity for football’s fight against discrimination”.

It comes after some Millwall fans booed the players taking a knee before Saturday’s defeat by Derby at The Den.

Players of both teams will collectively hold up an anti-racism banner.

Millwall’s regular shirt sponsor will be replaced with the logo of anti-discrimination body Kick It Out.

In a statement, Millwall said: “Millwall believe that this gesture, which the club hopes to repeat with other visiting teams in the coming weeks and months, will help to unify people throughout society in the battle to root out all forms of discrimination.

“Millwall have a zero-tolerance policy against racial and all other forms of discrimination and want to again make clear to anybody who holds such views that you are not welcome at this football club. Millwall’s stance, as always, is that anybody found guilty of racial abuse is banned for life.”

The decision came after a meeting on Monday between both clubs, Kick It Out, Show Racism The Red Card, the Professional Footballers’ Association (PFA), the Football Association (FA) and the English Football League (EFL).

Some QPR players will take the knee before Tuesday’s game at The Den, despite having stopped the gesture earlier this season after director of football Les Ferdinand said its impact had “been diluted”.

Players, officials and staff at Premier League and EFL games have been taking a knee pre-match since football restarted in June in order to show their support for the Black Lives Matter movement for racial equality.

The Den was able to host 2,000 home fans for the first time this season after the second national lockdown was lifted but the return of spectators was overshadowed by the booing, with which Millwall said they were “dismayed and saddened”.

The Millwall Supporters’ Club said the booing was not motivated by racism, but instead in opposition to the political views held by the Black Lives Matter organisation.

The FA has confirmed it is investigating the incident at Millwall, and a similar one at Colchester United’s League Two game against Grimsby Town.

If it finds that the actions were discriminatory, the clubs could face fines.

Speaking on BBC Radio 5 Live’s Monday Night Club, former England defender Micah Richards said booing is “not acceptable”.

“Millwall fans, from their point of view, this whole movement is becoming political. They’re saying they don’t think the players at their club should want to kneel because of what Black Lives Matter represents in their mind,” he said.

“If they’re booing that, it’s not acceptable, but it’s free speech and that is their opinion, but I think people are taking Black Lives Matter in a different context and changing the actual narrative of what it’s all about.

“When the players are taking the knee they are not saying black lives matter and they are any better than white lives, they are trying to say it’s a stand for equality and unity and that is why they are taking the knee.”

Analysis

BBC Sport football reporter Simon Stone

Sources described this evening’s meeting as “difficult but productive”.

It is understood the PFA was critical of the EFL’s perceived lack of involvement, a feeling many at the club share, having told it beforehand of what they feared was likely to happen at The Den on Saturday.

There are many unanswered questions for football and Millwall in particular and evidently solutions will not be easy.

However, the sense of desperation hanging round the club on Monday has now been replaced by a mixture of trepidation and optimism.

No-one at the club can be entirely sure of what will happen when the QPR players take a knee as planned before kick-off but the noises among fans on social media who backed the booing on Saturday is that these measures should be supported.

Millwall can only hope this is what happens. Because if what happened on Saturday is repeated, even insiders know the damage to the club will be catastrophic.

Banner Image Match of the Day 2FA Cup footer

bird control newbury park

Source link

Coronavirus pandemic: Tracking the global outbreak

People wearing masks in the street in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Coronavirus is continuing its spread across the world, with more than three million confirmed cases in 185 countries and more than 200,000 deaths.

The United States alone has more than one million confirmed cases – four times as many as any other country.

This series of maps and charts tracks the global outbreak of the virus since it emerged in China in December last year.

How many cases and deaths have there been?

The virus, which causes the respiratory infection Covid-19, was first detected in the city of Wuhan, China, in late 2019.

It is spreading rapidly in many countries and the number of deaths is still climbing.

Confirmed cases around the world

3,200,322 cases

230,043 deaths

955,586 recoveries


Group 4

Please upgrade your browser to see the full interactive

Source: Johns Hopkins University, national public health agencies

Figures last updated

30 April 2020, 18:29 BST

Note: The map and table in this page uses a different source for figures for France from that used by Johns Hopkins University which results in a slightly lower overall total.

The US has by far the largest number of cases, with more than one million confirmed infections, according to figures collated by Johns Hopkins University. With more than 60,000 fatalities, it also has the world’s highest death toll.

Italy, the UK, Spain and France – the worst-hit European countries – have all recorded more than 20,000 deaths.

In China, the official death toll is approaching 5,000 from about 84,000 confirmed cases. Numbers for deaths jumped on 17 April after what officials called “a statistical review” and critics have questioned whether the country’s official numbers can be trusted.

Scroll table to see more data

Please update your browser to see full interactive

This information is regularly updated but may not reflect the latest totals for each country.

Source: Johns Hopkins University, national public health agencies

Figures last updated: 30 April 2020, 18:29 BST

Note: The past data for new cases is a three day rolling average

The outbreak was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11 March. This is when an infectious disease is passing easily from person to person in many parts of the world at the same time.

More than three million people are known to have been infected worldwide, but the true figure is thought to be much higher as many of those with milder symptoms have not been tested and counted.

While the US and much of Europe has been hit hard by the virus, some countries have managed to avoid similar death tolls.

New Zealand, for instance, says it has effectively eliminated the threat for now after fewer than 1,500 cases and just 19 deaths.

The country brought in some of the toughest restrictions in the world on travel and activity early on in the pandemic but is now relaxing some of these. This week some non-essential businesses will be reopening but most people will still have to stay at home and avoid all social interactions.

While some countries are beginning to ease restrictions, others are only now starting to impose them as cases and deaths begin to rise.

Across Latin America, where many economies are already struggling and millions live on what they can earn day-to-day, there are concerns about the strain the growing number of virus cases could put on health care systems. Of particular concern are Ecuador and Brazil.

Ecuador has already seen its health system collapse – thousands have died from the virus and other conditions that could not be treated because of the crisis. While Brazil has also seen a steep rise in both cases and deaths, with every state in South America’s largest country affected.

Across the world, more than 4.5 billion people – half the world’s population – are estimated to be living under social distancing measures, according to the AFP news agency.

Those restrictions have had a big impact on the global economy, with the International Monetary Fund saying the world faces the worst recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

The UN World Food Programme has also warned that the pandemic could almost double the number of people suffering acute hunger.

Europe beginning to ease lockdown measures

The four worst-hit countries in Europe are Italy, the UK, Spain and France – all of which have recorded at least 20,000 deaths.

However, all four countries appear to have passed through the peak of the virus now and the number of reported cases and deaths is falling in each.

Germany and Belgium also recorded a relatively high number of deaths and are now seeing those numbers decrease, though as Belgium has a far smaller population than Germany the number of deaths per capita there has been higher.

How countries across Europe are deciding to move out of lockdown varies, with the EU saying there is “no one-size-fits-all approach” to lifting containment measures.

Spain has announced a four-phase plan to lift its lockdown and return to a “new normality” by the end of June. Children there under the age of 14 are now allowed to leave their homes for an hour a day, after six weeks in lockdown.

In Italy, certain shops and factories have been allowed to reopen and the prime minister says further measures will be eased from 4 May.

In France, the prime minister said this week that non-essential shops and markets will open their doors again from 11 May, but not bars and restaurants. Schools will also be reopened gradually.

Other European countries easing restrictions include Austria, Denmark, Switzerland, the Czech Republic and Germany, where children’s play areas and museums have been told they can reopen and church services can resume, under strict social distancing and hygiene rules.

In the UK, where there have been more than 170,000 confirmed cases and at least 26,000 deaths, lockdown measures are still in full effect. The prime minister has promised a “comprehensive plan” in the next week on how the government will get the country moving again.

New York remains epicentre of US outbreak

With more than one million cases, the US has the highest number of confirmed infections in the world. The country has also recorded more than 60,000 deaths.

The state of New York has been particularly badly affected, with 18,000 deaths in New York City alone, but Governor Andrew Cuomo says the toll “seems to be on a gentle decline”.

Mr Cuomo has suggested some parts of his state could begin to reopen after the current stay-at-home order expires on 15 May.

At one point, more than 90% of the US population was under mandatory lockdown orders, but President Trump has stated that he will not be renewing his government’s social distancing guidelines once they expire on Thursday and some states have already begun to lift restrictions.

Georgia, Oklahoma, Alaska and South Carolina have all allowed some businesses to reopen in recent days following official unemployment figures that showed more than 30 million Americans have lost their jobs since mid-March.

But public health authorities have warned that increasing human interactions and economic activity could spark a fresh surge of infections just as the number of new cases is beginning to ease off.

White House coronavirus taskforce coordinator Dr Deborah Birx has said social distancing should remain the norm “through the summer to really ensure that we protect one another as we move through these phases”.

rodent control

Source link

Koko Camden: Fire engulfs famous music venue

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionOne third of the roof of Koko in Camden was on fire at one point, the London Fire Brigade says

One of London’s most famous music venues has been badly damaged in an overnight blaze.

The dome on the roof of Koko in Camden has been destroyed by fire, according to the London Fire Brigade.

Sixty firefighters helped fight the flames after the blaze broke out just before 21:00 GMT on Monday and no injuries have been reported.

The venue which began life as the Camden Theatre in 1900 has hosted stars including Madonna, Coldplay and Prince.

Station commander Jon Lewis said the fire was brought under control at about 02:30 on Tuesday, adding: “Firefighters’ quick action and hard work in the early stages meant the fire was contained to the roof and saved the rest of the building.”

Koko owner Olly Bengough said he was “deeply saddened” by the blaze, adding: “We’ll be doing our best to get the redevelopment of this iconic building back on track.”

Image caption

The fire in the building’s roof was brought under control in the early hours of Tuesday

Crews will remain at the scene throughout the day and have warned people to stay away from the area.

Koko which was closed for refurbishment, was also previously known as the Camden Palace and Camden Hippodrome and has been one of the capital’s most iconic live music venues for decades.

The Rolling Stones, The Clash and Ed Sheeran are among other star names to have performed at the venue, which is close to Mornington Crescent underground station.

Image copyright
Oliver Cooper

Image caption

About 60 firefighters helped tackle a fire at Koko in Camden High Street

It was reportedly the last venue where AC/DC’s Bon Scott was seen drinking before his death from alcohol poisoning in 1980.

In the early 80s it served as a major venue for the punk and New Romantic scene, with singer Steve Strange of the band Visage holding club nights.

Image copyright
UniversalImagesGroup/Getty

Image caption

Opening night at Camden Palace 1981 with Steve Strange (left)

Members of the public have been sharing their Koko memories on Twitter.

Marc Rustic was “absolutely gutted” having seen his first grime gig at Koko.

“MoStack was performing and it was honestly the best night of my life,” he added.

Veteran DJ Tony Blackburn who held his legendary soul nights Shakatak also tweeted about the fire.

Koko and the nearby Roundhouse effectively “bookended” Camden’s music scene, according to music writer Carl Allen.

In between the two are 60 music venues including the Dingwalls and Electric Ballroom, as well as restaurants and pubs.

On Twitter the Roundhouse said it was “really sad” to hear the news about our Camden neighbours.

Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said: “Heartbreaking watching the Camden Palace/Koko up in flames this evening, a building that holds so many memories and means so much to us in Camden.”

The Mayor of London Sadiq Khan thanked the fire brigade for its quick response.

The venue was set to reopen in the spring after a “major state-of-the-art” refurbishment, after the purchase of two adjacent buildings.

Image caption

The venue hosted the BBC’s Electric Proms in 2007

Image copyright
PA Media

Image caption

Koko has hosted some of music’s biggest names including Madonna, The Rolling Stones and Prince


Do you have memories of attending gigs at Koko? Share your experiences by emailing .

Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways:



rat infestation

Source link

Norwich City v Crystal Palace

Norwich boss Daniel Farke saw his side draw with Spurs despite leading twice. The Canaries are the only club not to have won a Premier League point from a losing position this season.

TEAM NEWS

Norwich midfielder Kenny McLean is a doubt to face Crystal Palace because of a foot problem.

Josip Drmic is not expected to return until the weekend, while Ben Godfrey and Timm Klose are long-term absentees.

Crystal Palace manager Roy Hodgson is again expected to be without a host of first-team players.

Christian Benteke, Gary Cahill, Scott Dann, Jeffrey Schlupp, Andros Townsend, Joel Ward and Patrick van Aanholt are all on the sidelines.

Hodgson has revealed that Martin Kelly played with a muscle strain against Southampton, while Cheikhou Kouyate has said he has a groin issue.

MOTD COMMENTATOR’S NOTES

@chriswisey: